History is . . .

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Magnifying glass focused on the word history

In these times, when people are trying to erase or re-write history, we should look back on what others have had to say about the past. History is the version…

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Mortlake Gas Works

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Mortlake Bank, coal carrier

The Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) was formed in Sydney in 1837 to produce town gas for street lighting. The original works at Darling Harbour with its outstations at Woolloomooloo…

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Buy it Now

The book is now available from the City of Canada Bay Museum, 1 Bent Street, Concord at a cost of $20.00. We are open every Wednesday and Saturday from 10:00…

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The Golden Rule

            BRAHMINISM:   This is the sum of duty.   Do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.  (Mahabharata, 5, 1517)             BUDDHISM:   Hurt not others in…

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Garden Island

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Garden Island today

One of the prettiest islands in Port Jackson has the distinction of having given us our first bushranger, Black Caesar, whose story was in the August newsletter. The principal and…

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Russell Lea Manor

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Russell Lea Nerve Hospital

Russell Lea Manor, also known as Russell Lea House, was the home of Russell Barton (1830-1916), and was situated north of Lyons Road between Sibbick Street and Lyons Road.  The suburb of…

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The Colour Cure

Under the heading “Occupying “canary” room.  Nerve Cases are Soothed” the following article was published on 24 March 1919. In the new Red Cross convalescent Docks, Sydney, NSW, the colour…

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The Great Depression

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Relief workers given work at Concord. An old military uniform top has come in handtyas working clothe for thelad on the right. Obviously the task for the group was to use the shovel to put something into the empty kerosene tins and deposit it somewhere else. For this they received sustenance and were often known as “Sussos”. (Mitchell Library)

Times were hard, but we survived, just as we will survive the current crisis. By 1931 30% of NSW unionists were unemployed.  By 1933 one in three Australian breadwinners was…

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Exiles Who Changed a Nation

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Historian Tony Moore pictured at the "forgotten" grave of French Canadian exile Joseph Marceau at West Dapto in 2008. Picture: Greg Totman

Strangers in a strange land is a good title for a sci-fi novel. It also accurately reflects how Australia's founding fathers, our First Fleet convicts, would have felt on being…

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Cabarita Park

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Cabarita Park 1923 (Canada Bay Connections)

At the time of European settlement the Canada Bay area was part of the traditional lands of the Wangal clan of Aboriginal people. The Wangal were a clan of the…

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The Bulletin Debate

This debate was a famous dispute in The Bulletin magazine from 1892–93 between two of Australia’s most iconic writers and poets: Henry Lawson and Andrew Barton “Banjo” Paterson. At the time, The Bulletin was a popular and influential publication,…

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