More Than Just a Name

More Than Just a Name

Ken Beames – Optical Engineer and Astronomer In 2014 Canada Bay Council sponsored the “More Than Just a Name” project to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. The project memorialised the names of more than 1600 men and women who answered their country’s call to arms. Working with students from…

The People on Australian Banknotes (final)

The People on Australian Banknotes (final)

Reverend John Flynn Reverend John Flynn (1880-1951), born in Moliagul, Victoria, was a Presbyterian minister who was instrumental in founding what is today known as the Royal Flying Doctor Service. In 1911, at age 31, John was ordained into the ministry. He volunteered in rural areas and completed a survey of the Northern Territory, writing…

Needlework Tool Collectors

Needlework Tool Collectors

The Needlework Tool Collectors Society of Australia (NTCSA) began in 1987 in Melbourne, growing from the enthusiasm and interests of two sisters, Katrina and Jenny, who gathered together their friends and fellow collectors to form the Society.   When travelling interstate, they would arrange to have afternoon tea with other collectors, inviting them to join.  As numbers grew, it became…

More Than Just a Name

More Than Just a Name

The Stanton Brothers When war broke out in Europe in 1914, the Stanton brothers like many of their contemporaries, were eager to enlist in defence of “God, King and Country”. Older brother, Charles signed up in July 1915, leaving his wife May and two young children, Winifred aged 3 and Francis, born just 7 months…

Whittaker Street, Mortlake

Whittaker Street, Mortlake

Peter Whittaker was born in 1868 in Altrincham, Wilmslow, England.  He arrived in Brisbane in March 1891, where he joined the Royal Australian Artillery the following year.  In 1904 he resigned with the rank of Corporal. He married Blanche Bushell in 1898.  They had four children – two sons, Eugene and Norman,  and two daughters,…

Elizabeth & Elizabeth

Elizabeth & Elizabeth

There was a short time in Australia’s European history when two women wielded extraordinary power and influence behind the scenes of the fledgling colony.  In early 19th Century Sydney the two women, whose husbands were sworn enemies, would cross paths. These two courageous women came from strikingly different backgrounds, with husbands who held sharply conflicting…

July Guest Speaker

July Guest Speaker

Just a reminder that our July speaker, Warren Fahey, will be talking about his book “Dead and Buried”, the curious history of Sydney’s earliest burial grounds. You are invited to join us at our museum at 1 Bent Street (just around the corner from Wellbank Street) on Saturday, 2nd July at 2:00 pm sharp to…

Getting Old

Getting Old

Last year I joined a support group of procrastinators. We haven’t met yet. The biggest lie I tell myself is “I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.” I don’t have grey hair; I have “wisdom highlights”! I’m just very wise. I decided to stop calling the bathroom the “John” and renamed it…

Why Were Convicts Transported to Australia

Why Were Convicts Transported to Australia

Until 1782, English convicts were transported to America. However, in 1783 the American War of Independence ended. America refused to accept any more convicts so England had to find somewhere else to send their prisoners. Transportation to New South Wales was the solution. Life in Britain was very hard. As new machines were invented, people…

Drummoyne Remembers

Drummoyne Remembers

If you look at enough Great War memorials, it becomes apparent there is little uniformity in the way they are presented. Some list names in alphabetical order, others separate these by rank or in the order individuals enlisted. Before 1927 there was no national agency to collect the names of those who served or died…